Box Hand Painted

1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera

1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera
1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera
1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera
1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera
1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera
1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera
1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera
1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera
1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera

1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera

Russian hand painted lacquer box from Mstera. Measures: 160 mm (6.3 inch) x 110 mm (4.33 inch).

His works are now held in. All-Russia Museum of Decorative, Applied and Folk Art. The State Central Museum of Contemporary History of Russia.

The Murmansk regional art Museum. The Sergiev Posad State History and Art Museum- Preserve and other museums. There are signs of use on the box, but nothing serious.

Please, look at the photos. All photos are real, you receive what you see on them. A favorite among Russian tales, Ruslan and Ludmila was written in poetic form by Russia's most beloved writer, Alexander Pushkin.

It was later the basis of Glinka's most successful opera. Here is a brief synopsis of the story. Once upon a time, in a land far away there was a great feast celebrating the marriage of the land's greatest warrior, Ruslan, to the land's most beautiful maiden, Ludmila. But tragedy happened upon the feast when the bride was kidnapped by the dwarf magician Chernomor.

Enraged, Ludmila's father declared that only the warrior who rescues his daughter would be her husband. Ruslan and his rivals Farlaf, Ratmir, and Rogdai prepared to rescue the beautiful girl. Only Ruslan understood that he would have to overcome great feats and magical powers to rescue his bride. Rogdai killed Ratmir and then attacked Ruslan.

But Ruslan won the fight, and threw Rogdai into the River Dnieper. Ruslan wandered further into the unknown where he entered a thick fog and came upon a giant magic head. Underneath the head was a knife, which he knew he must retrieve. Ruslan defeated the head and took the knife.

He then was able to defeat Chernomor. He used this knife to cut off the dwarf's beard, thus having diminished the dwarf's magical powers. Having defeated Chernomor, Ruslan found his bride in a magical garden, he rescued Ludmila and took her back to the feast where they were finally married. Ruslan and Ludmila (by Alexander Pushkin).

But let's not stray too far. Who was it that the dwarf invited. So daringly to fight him? And by its sound the villain frightened?

Has reached the midget's castle. Beneath the palisades he's halted. The trumpet's sound comes storm-like, loud. The steed paws at the snowy ground.

The prince awaits the dwarf. What seems like thunder deafens him. By this his head is, yet with dim. Dull sight it is he upward gazes.

And sees the dwarf above him fly. A mammoth bludgeon lifted high. Ruslan bends down, his great shield raises. And waves his sword, but Chernomor. Sweeps upward; then, appearing o'er.

The prince again and downward swooping. He flies straight at him, whereupon. The latter feints, his rival duping.

And down the midget falls, straight on. The well-packed snow, with fear nigh frozen. Ruslan dismounts, and, never pausing. The space between them neatly cleared. Grabs the magician by the beard!

The captive grunts and strains, and, heaving. Himself from off the bank of snow.

Sails skyward with our hero, leaving. The knight's astonished steed below.

They're'neath the clouds, Ruslan still gripping. The beard and swinging in the air. O'er seas and forests, o'er the bare. And rugged hills, their summits tipping. The dwarf wings, and the stalwart knight.

Though numb and stiff his hand is growing. Used up by now and winded. His progress through the air at length. Amazed and awed by Russian strength.

He turns to our young knight and slyly. Says to him: Prince, I'll do you ill. No more; in faith, I value highly. Young valour such as yours and will. Descend at once-on one condition....

With my beloved bride's tormentor. Nor into any dealings enter. This sword-'tis only meet. Will punish you, and this most surel.

All of your wiles will serve you poorly! Fly to the stars, if you so choose. And still your whiskers you will lose! A horrid fear the wizard seizes.

In vain to free himself he tries. The prince's grip is like a vise. He tweaks the beard, and, gleeful, teases. The dwarf by plucking out the hairs.

For two whole days the midget bear. Ruslan, but on the third, a'quiver. With fright, he cries: Have mercy, pray! I've no breath left at all. Me from this plight without delay. I'm in your hands. Well, then, admit you're overcome. To my Ludmila quickly take me! What is old Chernomor to do? Obedience is his rival's due! And so he's off, quite ill and shaken. He sets the prince down. Ruslan the Head's sword raises briskly. With one strong hand; then,'thout delay. The other using, grasps the whiskers. And cuts them off like so much hay.

"There now, " he tells him, that will teach you! Where is that handsome tuft you prize. Your strength and pride, you thieving creature? And to his helm the dwarfs beard ties.

He calls his bay who joins him, neighing. Into a bag the pasty-faced. And half-dead wizard stuffs in haste. The dancing steed no longer staying. Up to the massive palace portal. Ruslan-there is no happier mortal. In hot impatience steps inside. The item "1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera" is in sale since Saturday, November 2, 2019. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Cultures & Ethnicities\Russian". The seller is "steklogriz_9" and is located in St. This item can be shipped worldwide.
1953 vintage soviet USSR russian hand painted palekh lacquer box, Mstera